An 11-Year-Old Ballerina Is Inspiring Other Children To Say, “Hey, I Can Do It Too”

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An 11-Year-Old Ballerina Is Inspiring Other Children To Say, “Hey, I Can Do It Too”

Posted by: Mayukh Category: Inspiring People Tags: , , Comments: 0

An 11-Year-Old Ballerina Is Inspiring Other Children To Say, “Hey, I Can Do It Too”

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Brave are they who leave the crowd and strikes out on their own; for they do not have the comfort of past experiences to lean on or learn from. It is all new and unexplored to them. But then nothing is over and done with till it is started. Charlotte Nebres is too young at 11 to be called a pioneer. But she has managed to break a glass ceiling. Charlotte has succeeded in bagging the lead part of Marie in George Balanchine’s “The Nutcracker”, produced by the New York City Ballet. She is the first Black ballerina to do so. This ballerina is inspiring other children to follow their dreams.

Charlotte’s family came from Trinidad on her mother’s side, while her father hails from the Philippines. She is part of the School of American Ballet, founded by choreographer George Balanchine way back in 1934 to nurture young talent who could perform in the New York City Ballet.

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IN THE NEWS // The four School of American Ballet @sab_nyc children who alternate the roles of Marie and the Nutcracker Prince were recently profiled in The New York Times by Gia Kourlas. She sat down with them to discuss the rehearsal process, their lives off-stage, and their roles in the ballet.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ When asked about why ballet is important to her now, in this moment, 11 year-old Charlotte Nebres, pictured here in rehearsal for her role as Marie, said:⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ "To me, it just feels like when I dance I feel free and I feel empowered. I feel like I can do anything when I dance. It makes me happy, and I’m going to do what makes me happy. You don’t need to think about anything else."⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Photo: Heather Sten @heathersten for The New York Times @nytimes⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ See these very young dancers, who are the heart of George Balanchine's The Nutcracker®, now on stage through JAN 5. Tap the link in bio for tickets and more information.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ #nutcracker #nycbnutcracker #thenutcracker #nutcrackerballet #holidayseason #georgebalanchinesthenutcracker #ballet #dance #balletdancer #dancelife #balletlife #instaballet #dancers #choreography #balanchine #nycb #nycballet #newyorkcityballet #newyorkcity #linkinbio #schoolofamericanballet

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It’s Impossible Until It’s Done

It isn’t easy to stand out as pioneers in your field. You need to bring a certain amount of intensity and it is a lonely road to walk on. Dena Abergel, the children’s ballet master at the Ballet said that she is primarily looking for somebody who can act and present a story. She needs to have a command of the stage, someone who has both the spontaneity and confidence to handle all that is thrown her way.

Most of the City Ballet’s members come from the School of American Ballet, and Charlotte is a student there. The world-famous production has been on stage since 1954. She says she has been dancing all her life.

Charlotte has a flair for acting and her mother discovered it only later. The mother could not believe it when she broke the news first. She says it is unbelievable that her daughter is the first Black ballerina to have landed the role. Charlotte encourages others to adopt a fresh point of view while seeing things. The youthful Black ballerina is confident that this step forward will encourage other Black people to take up ballet after her breakthrough role. This ballerina is surely inspiring other children and even adults!

(Heather Sten, for The New York Times)

She is elated at having got the chance to represent S.A.B. and also being a part of a multi-cultural group of performers. This eclectic mix should inspire a disadvantaged child to come forward with confidence. She doesn’t want her experience to be one of a kind. She wants more multi-ethnic people to come forward.

The Times They Are A-Changin’

Charlotte believes it is an amazing experience to be fortunate enough to represent a multi-cultural and ethnic group. She is proud to be part of the S.A.B. Charlotte’s prince is Tanner Quirk and he is half Chinese. Sophia Thomopoulos is half Greek and half Korean and will also play Marie, while her prince, Kai Misra-Stone is half South Asian.

Charlotte was only six when Misty Copeland became the first woman of African descent to become the principal at American Ballet Theatre. Seeing her on stage had made an impact on young Charlotte’s mind. And now she herself is on her way: 11-year-old ballerina inspiring other children.

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IN THE NEWS // The four @sab_nyc children who alternate the roles of Marie and the Nutcracker Prince were recently profiled in The New York Times by Gia Kourlas. She sat down with them to discuss the rehearsal process, their lives off-stage, and their roles in the ballet.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ When asked who the Nutcracker Prince is to him, 11-year-old Kai Misra-Stone (pictured at top right) said, "The Prince is this character that develops. In the beginning, he is Drosselmeier’s nephew and then it’s almost as if he transforms into the Nutcracker and then goes back to being the Prince. He comes out of his shell and just opens up and is like: Here I am."⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Thirteen-year-old Tanner Quirk (pictured in the foreground), is the oldest of the four, and has also previously played Marie's bratty brother Fritz in the production. To him, the Nutcracker Prince "is very brave and compassionate especially toward his Marie, which is what I aspire to be like in real life, too."⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Photo: Heather Sten @heathersten for The New York Times @nytimes⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ See these very young dancers who are the heart of George Balanchine's The Nutcracker®, now on stage through JAN 5. Tap the link in bio for tickets and more information.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ #nutcracker #nycbnutcracker #thenutcracker #nutcrackerballet #holidayseason #georgebalanchinesthenutcracker #ballet #dance #boysdancetoo #balletdancer #dancelife #balletlife #instaballet #dancers #choreography #balanchine #nycb #nycballet #newyorkcityballet #newyorkcity #linkinbio #schoolofamericanballet

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eauty of Misty Copeland on stage inspired Charlotte. It was a boost up for the impressionable mind of a six-year-old. It gave her the belief that even she could one day be up there with the best.

We encounter many barriers, many defeats, but we must never be defeated. We learn who we are through encountering such defeats. It helps us know who we are, where we come from. it gives us a chance to know how badly we want something. The barriers are in place to stop people who don’t want it badly enough. It helps us to come out of the situation we are in.

Read: Kenzie Zacharias Brings Her Positivity To The Ground By Becoming A Wonderful Cheerleader

Charlotte topped a strong field of 180 dancers to make it to the top. It is a tough selection process for the ballerina who is inspiring so many others. The dancers are selected based on their cohesion, stability, and the ability to convey a dramatic finesse on stage. Her mother was also a dancer and she is elated that people have found something special in Charlotte to accept her for such a big role. Her mother says that her daughter is quiet and artistic.

Daniella doesn’t want disappointments and hurts in the past to get to them. She believes they need to have a fresh perspective through which they should view their world. The ballerina wants to inspire other children who will come later. They need to be able to see her on stage and say, “Hey, I can do that too”.

Charlotte says that when she dances she feels free and empowered. It gives her the power to do anything. She is happy and she is surely going to do something that makes her happy. It takes her mind off everything else. This Black ballerina has shown that courage of all things is the most important virtue and it is that which has kept her going.

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